Burdett Trust for Nursing

Improving Healthcare through Nurse-led initiatives. Registered Charity 1089849


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Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) goes from strength to strength

person using black blood pressure monitor

In 2014, the charity Anthony Nolan, with funding from the Burdett Trust for Nursing, set up a programme to fund clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) who support people who have had a blood stem cell transplant.

What does an Anthony Nolan post-transplant CNS do?

As experienced healthcare professionals, each Anthony Nolan CNS has expert knowledge of the unique needs of these patients and they are in the ideal position to be able to provide comprehensive care. They address the medical needs of the patients they are supporting, as well as their emotional and psychological wellbeing.

Although the nurses broadly undertake similar roles, we believe that for our clinical programme to be truly effective, the role of each CNS should be tailored to meet the specific needs of the patients at the transplant centres where they are based, as well as focusing on the areas of care in which existing staff feel they are currently lacking resources.

Why are they needed?

Anthony Nolan researched the provision of post-transplant care across the UK and found that not all post-transplant patients have a dedicated, named CNS. This gap in service provision has a detrimental impact on a patient’s quality of life and their ability to recover successfully.

Given the potential severity of the physical and psychological implications of transplantation, patients need to be offered comprehensive care that is co-ordinated by transplant specialists and that should ensure patients can rapidly access high-quality services to fully meet their care needs.

How is the programme performing?

Senior Philanthropy Manager Anaily Castellanos​ says:

“The CNS programme has gone from strength to strength.

To date, nine Anthony Nolan nurses have been introduced to transplant centres across the country, providing life-affirming support for post-transplant patients. This would not have been possible without the Trust and we are incredibly grateful for your support.”


The Burdett Trust for Nursing was established in 2002 with the aim of making charitable grants to support the nursing contribution to healthcare. The Trustees target their grants at projects that are nurse-led and that empower nurses to make significant improvements to the patient care environment. The Trustees regularly review their grant-making policies and procedures to ensure that their grants achieve positive outcomes for patients, nursing and healthcare practice.

Find us online: www.btfn.org.uk

Facebook: facebook.com/burdetttrust

Twitter: @burdetttrust

 

 

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Highlights from The Burdett Trust Nursing Symposium 2018

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Shirley Baines, Chief Executive of The Burdett Trust for Nursing welcoming delegates.

On September 17th, The Burdett Trust welcomed attendees to our 2018 Strengthening Nurse Leadership & Training Symposium.

The conference heard from health professionals who are working to break new ground in this area with the help of grants from The Burdett Trust for Nursing.

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Source: Twitter

Presenters included Karen Stansfield, who is working with iHV training, whereby a group of health visitors and school nurses have received cognitive behaviour therapy as part of an innovative leadership project designed to combat feelings of self-doubt.

Gail Wilson, deputy clinical director and head of education at St Luke’s Hospice in Plymouth, also presented on how they are enabling nurse leaders to develop “informal networks” made up of a patient’s family, friends and neighbours to help them receive the care they need at home. The charity carried out a study involving six terminally ill patients assigned to its crisis team.

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Source: Twitter

Catherine Gamble and Kiran Jnagal from South West London and St George’s Mental Health NHS Trust presented their dedicated leadership programme for its black and minority ethnic (BME) nursing workforce in partnership with Kingston University.

Other presenters included Karen Cleaver, head of family care and mental health faculty of education and health at the University of Greenwich, who leading on a research project around retention of nurses in their later careers, as well as Gemma Stacey and Aimee Aubeeluck from the University of Nottingham, and Jane Wray from the University of Hull, who are leading on projects around newly qualified nurse retention.

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An extract from the presentation given by Gemma Stacey & Dr. Aimee Aubeeluck


The Burdett Trust for Nursing was established in 2002 with the aim of making charitable grants to support the nursing contribution to healthcare. The Trustees target their grants at projects that are nurse-led and that empower nurses to make significant improvements to the patient care environment. The Trustees regularly review their grant-making policies and procedures to ensure that their grants achieve positive outcomes for patients, nursing and healthcare practice.

Find us online: www.btfn.org.uk

Facebook: facebook.com/burdetttrust

Twitter: @burdetttrust

 


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150 Leaders to Continue in Partnership with Council of Deans Health

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The Burdett Trust for Nursing is delighted to confirm that the 150 Leaders project, which is a Student Leadership programme, will continue in partnership with Council of Deans for a further three years.

The Student Leadership Programme aims to promote and develop leadership skills among the future nursing, midwifery and AHP workforce by working with first and second year pre-registration students. Using information from a student survey and the input of students on the project advisory group the programme has been co-designed with students to ensure it focuses on areas not covered in current pre-registration curricula.

Following a two-day residential programme including workshops, scenario-building activities and self-reflection exercises, participants will go on to be mentored by a leader from within the health and higher education sectors and form an online community to support their future leadership journey.

The programme is for individuals who aspire to lead and make a difference who are currently enrolled in the first or second year of their studies or are a first year pre-registration postgraduate student in nursing, midwifery or one of the Allied Health Professions.

The Burdett Trust subsidises participation costs for the programme through the award of a grant, meaning there is no charge to the 90 individuals selected to participate.

Abigail Spragg, who was a Student Leadership Programme member in 2017, had the following to say about the programme:

I cannot thank the Council of Deans and the Burdett Trust for providing students with this experience. It has been invaluable and precious to me and I know so many others feel the same. I hope in the future the student leadership programme can be adapted and shaped to be a part of every healthcare students journey, as I know so many others would benefit from what the incredible programme has to offer.


The Burdett Trust for Nursing was established in 2002 with the aim of making charitable grants to support the nursing contribution to healthcare. The Trustees target their grants at projects that are nurse-led and that empower nurses to make significant improvements to the patient care environment. The Trustees regularly review their grant-making policies and procedures to ensure that their grants achieve positive outcomes for patients, nursing and healthcare practice.

Find us online: www.btfn.org.uk

Facebook: facebook.com/burdetttrust

Twitter: @burdetttrust


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Wellbeing of Women Research Training Fellowships Open for Applications

clinic doctor health hospital

Wellbeing of Women, a Burdett Trust grant recipient, has recently announced the opening of their 2019 Research Training Fellowships.

Research Training Fellowships (RTF) encourage medical graduates to pursue a career in academic medicine. Research can be in basic science, clinical, or translational research including explanatory and feasibility studies in one of the following three areas:

  • Pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period
  • Gynaecological cancers
  • General wellbeing surrounding women’s health issues

Wellbeing of Women will award to medical graduates pursuing a career in obstetrics, gynaecology or focused on women’s reproductive health.

The Wellbeing of Women website states the following with regards to the funding:

Fellowships are awarded for up to three years and cover the cost of a full-time salary up to Specialty Registrar grade (or equivalent), consistent with current NHS or academic scales. Registration fees for a higher degree and reasonable research expenses may be allowed and should be specified in the application. The upper limit of this award is £250,000. The research must be undertaken in the UK or Ireland.

Research Training Fellows will normally be expected to enrol for a higher degree. A Fellowship will only be awarded to an applicant who has been accepted for a place in a department with established expertise in the specified field. Candidates must provide evidence of previous interest and training in research methodology. Both the training and research project must be capable of being brought to a conclusion within the duration of the Fellowship. Applications may be made for the financial support of work already in progress, or for a new project, provided a substantial element of training is provided during the course of the work.

The application form and guidelines will be available this Tuesday, 17 July from here.

 


The Burdett Trust for Nursing was established in 2002 with the aim of making charitable grants to support the nursing contribution to healthcare. The Trustees target their grants at projects that are nurse-led and that empower nurses to make significant improvements to the patient care environment. The Trustees regularly review their grant-making policies and procedures to ensure that their grants achieve positive outcomes for patients, nursing and healthcare practice.

Find us online: www.btfn.org.uk

Facebook: facebook.com/burdetttrust

Twitter: @burdetttrust


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Norfolk and Suffolk Men’s Wellbeing Project shines a spotlight on Men’s Mental Health

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Dr John Barry, co-founder of the Male Psychology Network, challenging stereotypes regarding male mental health.

This blog post was written with the assistance of Gabriel Abotsie, Men’s Wellbeing Nursing Lead at Hellesdon Hospital.

On 23rd November 2017, NSFT (Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust) held its first conference as part of the Men’s Wellbeing Project funded by The Burdett Trust. The aim of this event was to raise awareness, challenge stereotypes and encourage men to seek Mental Health help when they need it.

Over 200 people attended on the day and the event brought together service users, carers, health and social care professionals, third sector organisations and members of the public. There were also representatives from statutory agencies such as the police, fire service and county council.

The Men’s Health Wellbeing Project

The Men’s Wellbeing Project is running for two years and aims to encourage men to talk more openly about their emotions, to improve men’s access to mental health services and promote education and social inclusion. The project is informed by the statistics that men are three times more likely to take their own lives and yet the least likely to seek help for mental health issues.

Through the funding NSFT was able to employ two Men’s Wellbeing Nurses (shared fulltime equivalent role) to run the project; Gabriel Abotsie and Andrew Fisk. At the conference, Gabriel and Andrew shared what has been achieved so far, including examples of successful nursing engagement approaches for working with men. They spoke about the positive impact their training sessions are having on staff attitudes towards men’s mental health issues and about events and activities run through the project ranging from sports to talks to social events, all aimed at challenging stereotypes of masculinity that prevent men from seeking help.

Through collaborations with other organisation’s in Norfolk, the project has set up a football group dubbed “All to play for”, which encourages men who are finding life a bit difficult to play football in a friendly and non-judgmental environment. Two members of the group touched the hearts of the event attendees when they spoke about how the team is helping them to overcome their anxieties, suicidal thoughts and thus encouraging them to engage with health services again.

The Men’s Health Conference

The conference was also lucky to hear from Dr Roger Kingerlee a Clinical Psychologist, and Dr John Barry, co-founder of the Male Psychology Network. Both spoke about male psychologies and health-seeking behaviour. Deborah Harrison (an academic occupational therapist) also shared knowledge on successful engagement with males from her own work.

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Cedrick Anselin, a former Norwich footballer, speaking about his personal experience of depression and urging men to talk about their mental health.

Attendees were also fortunate enough to hear personal experiences of mental health breakdown from Luke Woodley, founder of The Walnut Tree Project who suffered from PTSD. As well as former Norwich City footballer Cedric Anselin and Dr Richard Gorrod, NSFT Service User Governor both of whom experienced and still live with depression.

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In addition to attendees services such as The Wellbeing Service, Menshed, Mencraft, the 12th Man, Active Health Norfolk, Samaritans, Mind, Health Watch Norfolk and Public Health Norfolk all attended – these organisations form part of a network established by the Men’s Wellbeing Project.

Attendees left with the message that “being a man doesn’t mean suffering in silence” and much positive feedback was received from those there.

For more information about NSFT’s Men’s Wellbeing Project, click here.

 


The Burdett Trust for Nursing was established in 2002 with the aim of making charitable grants to support the nursing contribution to healthcare. The Trustees target their grants at projects that are nurse-led and that empower nurses to make significant improvements to the patient care environment. The Trustees regularly review their grant-making policies and procedures to ensure that their grants achieve positive outcomes for patients, nursing and healthcare practice.

Find us online: www.btfn.org.uk

Facebook: facebook.com/burdetttrust

Twitter: @burdetttrust


Leave a comment

Burdett Trust Award Winners 2018

The very first Burdett Trust Awards was held on 24th May 2018 at the Waldorf Hilton Hotel in London, hosted by Call the Midwife actress Helen George. Thank you to all the attendees, brilliant nominees and congratulations to all our deserving winners.

Please find the winners list below.

Young People’s Health winner (sponsored by Bircham Dyson Bell):

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School Nurse Team,

The Children’s Trust

 

Delivering Dignity winner (sponsored by Chamberlain Dunn):

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Providing End of Life Care in Prison,

St Luke’s Hospice, Plymouth and Care UK 

 

Global Health Impacts winner:

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Critical Care Child Nursing Teaching Team,

Child Nurse Practice Development Initiative, University of Cape Town 

 

Men’s Health winner:

state of mind sport

State of Mind Sport Charity

 

Mental Health Nursing winner:

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Psychological Therapies Implementation Team,

South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland 

 

Maternal Health winner (sponsored by Haysmacintyre):

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GSST Safeguarding Midwives, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London

 

Who Cares, Wins winners:

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Rapid Intervention Team,

The Royal Wolverhamptom NHS Trust

 

Overall winner:

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Providing End of Life Care in Prison

St Luke’s Hospice, Plymouth and Care UK 

 

burdett trust awards